The Brooklyn Museum and its Mission: A Conversation with Contemporary Artist Santi Moix

 Santi and I at the Brooklyn Museum's entrance pavillion which was designed by John Stewart Polsheck and opened to the public in 2004. Picture and video by  Peter Koloff of Black Dot Creative . Other images courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and the artist 

Santi and I at the Brooklyn Museum's entrance pavillion which was designed by John Stewart Polsheck and opened to the public in 2004. Picture and video by Peter Koloff of Black Dot Creative. Other images courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery and the artist 

I really love the Brooklyn Museum and think it is an extraordinary institution that is supporting diversity in the arts in a way like not many other not-for-profit organizations are.  I feel that the programs and shows that the museum develops are inclusive and democratic, without compromising their very high curatorial standards.  In fact, some of my favorite shows of the past few years have taken place in the Brooklyn Museum including Andy Warhol’s The Last Decade; Keith Haring’s 1978-1982Mickalene Thomas’s Origin of the Universe and Wangechi Mutu’s “A Fantastic Journey”. All of these shows have had the fantastic quality to engage the mind, heart and eye of the audiences, a not-so-easy feat taking into consideration that a sheer volume of shows that are happening in museums in New York City and around the world, fail to accomplish what I call an “immersive experience of the senses” where there is an emotional and visual component that leave people wanting to know more about and to see more contemporary art.

Also, because I think it is important to highlight the mission of the Museum and show how amazing some the projects that they have supported are, I sat down at the pavillion with an acclaimed artist, the beyond talented Spanish-born and Brooklyn-based Santi Moix so we could talk more about his experience working there.  Santi was invited last year to draw an outstanding mural of monumental proportions that would take up an entire wall of the fourth floor where the contemporary art galleries are. Moix worked three nights and used special scaffolding to reach the highest points - everything was drawn with charcoal using his own hand.  The concept behind the mural and the accompanying watercolor piece was based on the Huckleberry Finn series that Santi had been working on at that time.  He felt enticed and inspired by the curiosity that exists in the mind of children, a very special audience that Santi considers his favorite.  That is why he called the mural “Huckleberry Finn, I don’t take no stock in mathematics, anyway” so that it reminds us of the freedom, creativity and openness with which a child sees the world. Here is our video interview: 

Every year since 2010, the Museum hosts The Brooklyn Artists Ball which celebrates Brooklyn’s creative community and honors artists and individuals who have made a significant contribution to the art world.  This year, the Museum will honor art patrons Jane and David Walentas and artists Jenny HolzerAi Weiwei, and Kehinde Wiley.  The gala and its already very notorious After-Party will take place on Wednesday, April 16. The After-Party during which guests will enjoy dessert, amazing music by some of the best New York City DJs and performances by Brooklyn-based artists is an excellent opportunity to get involved with the Brooklyn Museum community while supporting the Museum’s mission. Tickets can be purchased here. Santi and I will be at the Brooklyn Museum After-Party on the 16th and would love to see many of you!